Front-loading the Writing Process: Reducing the Cognitive Load

Picasso’s quote may seem somewhat contradictory as giving answers is not necessarily a useless trait; however, dig a little deeper and it makes a lot of sense. Computers (or rather Google) give us the answers we are looking for — we receive an output for a question asked. This isn’t necessarily a negative thing — […]

Identity Synthesis: Authenticity, Vulnerability, and Revision

This year in my school district, my colleagues and I have held rich and ongoing conversations about ways to be more culturally and historically responsive in our curriculum and instruction. Within these conversations, we discovered that part of being more responsive in these matters involves valuing our students’ sense of identity in their learning. In […]

Writing Relationships: “Slide”ing into Writing

This year at Moving Writers, I hope to explore various ways to utilize writing practices in your classroom to build strong social-emotional relationships with students despite the physical separations imposed on classrooms by the pandemic. I hope very much that this proves to be a limited series… When I posted my first contribution of the […]

True Crime During Class Time: Engaging Writers Using a Crime Scene

Everyone is obsessed with true crime lately.  True crime podcasts, true crime TV shows, true crime movies, true crime documentaries. I feel like every time I turn around, I see another preview for another true crime series on Netflix.  And, here’s the thing, I’m totally down for it.  My podcasts, my list on Netflix – […]