Recently …

Guest Post! Mentor Text Wednesday: Linda Holmes’ “Rainbows, Frogs, Dogs, and ‘The Muppet Movie’ Soundtrack at 40”

Today’s guest writer Emily Sommer walks us through a mentor text by one of our favorite pop culture writers, showing how it makes for a truly instructive piece for students learning the art of rhetorical analysis. Emily teaches AP English Language and Composition, AP Seminar, and Mythology at Stoney Creek High School in Rochester Hills, Michigan.  […]

Writing Workshop Communication: Sharing Student Writing Outside Your Classroom

Publishing is a big part of writing workshop — whether students publish in Teen Ink or through a writing contest or simply by sitting in the “author’s chair” (something middle and high school students still love, surprisingly) and reading their favorite line. But often the school community, administrators, and parents miss these big moments. They just […]

Group Work: Solving Problems and Raising the Level of Discussions

This series is called “Just Like Starting Over” because there are points throughout the semester (breaks, starting new units, abandoning disaster situations, etc.) in which we are given the opportunity to start over. In this series I’ll be asking a few important questions of myself, and in turn, of you, dear reader: what if you […]

Mini Conferences, Major Payoffs: Why You Should Confer About Low Stakes Writing

We are back with another buddy post! The more we talk about what building authentic relationships with our writers looks like in our classrooms, the more we realize we have similar strategies that work with our different populations.  This month we’re tackling low stakes writing and how we use it to create a culture of […]

Books That Move Us: Every Child Can Write by Melanie Meehan

A question I hear again and again is that while writing workshop seems great for eager writers and high-achieving students, but can it really work for students who aren’t natural writers? When I get this question, I emphatically say, “YES!  Writing workshop helps every writer take their work to the next level because it is […]

Books That Move Us: They Say/I Say: Moves that Matter in Academic Writing by Cathy Birkenstein and Gerald Graff

How many essays have you written for academic purposes? It is likely that if you are reading this, you have a minimum of a bachelor’s degree.  Let’s say that while earning said bachelor’s degree, you took an average of 5 classes in the fall semester and 5 classes in the spring semester for 4 years.  […]

Fun with Words: Neologisms (and leveraging a student’s native language)

This post is a reminder for those of us who have students who, whether overt or not, speak English as a second or third language… First of all…what the heck does “quockerwodger” mean? It is one of those English words that we don’t use in the everyday sort of way…crapulous, buss, and zafty (anyone?) Quockerwodger […]

Mentor Text Wednesday: Purr-fect Mentor Texts for Film Analysis

Mentor Texts: “All of the Little Things That Made the Original ‘Lion King’ so Great” by Shea Serrano “The effanineeffable, deep and inscrutable, singular Cats” by Alissa Wilkinson Techniques: Developing an argument Pre-writing Writing Introductions Writing Listicles Background – I’ve been thinking, for a long time, about the listicle form. We all know that it’s a […]